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django-sse

HTML5 Server-Sent Events integration for Django

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==========

django-sse

Warning: this package is now unmantained because django is not the optimal platform for persistent connections. I strongly recommend use anything like tornado or asyncio with python3 for this purpose.

Django integration with Server-Sent Events. (http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/eventsource/basics/) (https://developer.mozilla.org/es/docs/Server-sent_events/utilizando_server_sent_events_sse)

This django application uses the module sse_, simple python implementation of sse protocol.

Introduction

Is very similar to Django's generic views.

django-sse exposes a generic view for implement the custom logic of the data stream. Additionally, it exposes some helper views for simple enqueuing messages for a client, using redis or rabbitmq(not implemented).

NOTE: it strongly recomended expose this views with gevent pywsgi server, because every connection is permanent blocking stream.

Implementing own view with sample stream


The idea is to create a stream of data to send the current timestamp every 1 second to the client:

.. code-block:: python

    from django_sse.views import BaseSseView
    import time

    class MySseStreamView(BaseSseView):
        def iterator(self):
            while True:
                self.sse.add_message("time", str(time.time()))
                yield
                time.sleep(1)


The ``iterator()`` method must be a generator of data stream. The view has ``sse`` object,
for more information, see sse_ module documentation.

The acomulated data on sse is flushed to the client every iteration (yield statement).
You can flush the buffer, sometimes as you need.


Using a redis as message queue for push messages to client

django-sse currently implements a redis helper for simple enqueuing messages for push to a clients. For use it, the first step is a url declaration:

.. code-block:: python

from django.conf.urls import patterns, include, url
from django_sse.redisqueue import RedisQueueView

urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^stream1/$', RedisQueueView.as_view(redis_channel="foo"), name="stream1"),
)

This, on new connection is created, opens connection to redis and subscribe to a channel. On new messages received from redis, it flushes theese to client.

And the second step, your can push messages to the queue in any other normal django views with a simple api:

.. code-block:: python

from django.http import HttpResponse
from django_sse.redisqueue import send_event

def someview(request):
    send_event("myevent", "mydata", channel="foo")
    return HttpResponse("dummy response")

RedisQueueView precises of redis, put your connection params on your settings.py:

.. code-block:: python

REDIS_SSEQUEUE_CONNECTION_SETTINGS = {
    'location': 'localhost:6379',
    'db': 0,
}

Can subscribe to a channel dynamically with some parameter on url?

Yes, you need create a subclass of RedisQueueView and overwrite the method get_redis_channel. Example:

.. code-block:: python

# urls.py
urlpatterns = patterns('',
    url(r'^sse/(?P<channel>\w+)/$', MyRedisQueueView.as_view(redis_channel="foo"), name="stream1"),
)

class MyRedisQueueView(RedisQueueView):
    def get_redis_channel(self):
        return self.kwargs['channel'] or self.redis_channel

Contributors:

License

BSD License

.. _sse: https://github.com/niwibe/sse

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