react

A declarative, efficient, and flexible JavaScript library for building user interfaces.

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Lior GrossmanSan Francisco26 Ratings11 Reviews
Entrepreneur, technologist, product guy
June 19, 2020
Great Documentation
Easy to Use
Performant
Highly Customizable

I've moved about 4 years ago from Angular to React and never looked back. React is so much more performant with the shadow DOM, and allows building component-based apps that are modular and easy to maintain. When they first introduced Hooks, at first I was reluctant since it seemed like a regression from OOP to functional programming, but I decided to take the leap, and actually found Hook-based apps to be more predictable and easier to maintain. Haven't started speaking about the ecosystem - thousands of libraries allowing you to easily do just about anything in React. React is definitely my weapon of choice when it comes to frontend development.


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Vasily ShelkovDorset45 Ratings46 Reviews
8 months ago
Great Documentation
Easy to Use
Performant
Responsive Maintainers

Your developer will thank you. It takes your UI web development to a whole new level. React helps you build maintainable projects which feel intuitive. Developers can share code more easily, take advantage of the massive catalog of react libraries (from things as complex as tables to as simple as a modal). I've been using it for around 7 years so not far from the beginning. In that time my favour towards it has never wavered. It brought components to the web and gives you the flexibility to pick and choose the parts that matter to you instead of being forced to take what you get with the framework like angular. I hope this review finds you well and you consider at least trying it. There are plenty of up to date resources about learning react. Make sure that it is a recent tutorial since as with a lot of the web, in that many years, a lot of the tutorials might be using old or even worse deprecated apis. React is coming for you, after having developed on the web, I then also went on to build a react-native application which was a great experience in terms of knowing how to build it (for the most part), the hard part was what to do with the built application. Then I've used React to build chrome extensions. It's a great framework to know which really has built my confidence as a developer. VR development, here I come !


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Ben CohenUnited States3 Ratings1 Review
10 months ago
Great Documentation
Easy to Use

As a former Angular developer, I would say that React solves the problem of the view layer very well. JavaScript + JSX turns out to be a much more powerful templating language than any custom HTML templating language like Handlebars. Overall the development experience with React is far superior to that of Angular and seems to be the new de facto solution in the way jQuery was 10 years ago.


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Ashik MeerankuttyIdukki, Kerala68 Ratings72 Reviews
5 months ago
Easy to Use
Bleeding Edge
Highly Customizable
Responsive Maintainers
Great Documentation

I have been using react for almost 3 years. With react its easy to create re-usable components that are easy to use and maintain. Also there is a large ecosystem of component libraries which are written in React to make developer's life so easier. I also tried other frontend javascript libraries with React API like inferno.The thing those libraries lacks is the hooks. It is a lot easier to write reusable hooks in react that helps in easy abstraction of various logics which makes the code neater. If you are looking for performance I don't think that rect is the best option here. A better alternative is to use inferno which is created for performance and is based on React API. The great thing is that there are a lot of tutorials about react, so getting started with it is very easy, And testing libraries like enzyme and react-testing-library makes testing react components much easier.


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AllenAJ
Florian WendelbornBerlin, Germany4 Ratings3 Reviews
Full-stack dev since '06, experienced with TS/JS, Node, React, Vue, Docker, Python, (No)SQL, Django/DRF, DevOps & more. Studies CS @ Humboldt University Berlin.
1 month ago
Great Documentation
Performant
Highly Customizable
Easy to Use

React is a solid choice for any size of project or company. It’s very stable, flexible, and most importantly has the best tooling, IDE, and library support out of any modern frontend framework. I’ve personally used it pretty much since it came out, back when one would still have to manually configure babel to transpile the JSX. I still prefer it for any purpose due to its great tooling support and due to JSX being the standard by now that’s supported by everyone. I think the basic architecture of react as well as the flux pattern are well thought-through and offer a solid foundation to build upon. It’s especially great for companies as the job market for react developers is one of the largest and hiring experienced people (given adequate salary) should not be an issue. Most experienced frontend developers have already worked with react and it should be easy to get them familiar with react codebases. Personally, I think this is a great reason to choose a framework, as I’ve worked with companies that unfortunately picked lesser-known (and IMO objectively worse) frameworks like vue. That leads to them either having to hire non-vue developers or not being able to find anyone who fits the position well. In fact, most of the best developers they managed to hire were react users that just used their knowledge to work with vue. However, it’s often worse to find someone who’s good at something just to have to teach them something else, so react has a big advantage here. Tooling like eslint, typescript, sass, etc. is easily integrated and react as well as JSX/TSX templates are natively supported by all major tools. This is a big contrast to other frameworks I used like vue, which are struggling on this aspect due to their non-standard file types (vue single-file-components) and custom template syntax. I’ve personally struggled for days upon days with solving basic issues like building vue libraries with composition API, linting vue files, dead code elimination, compiling JSX-in-vue, integrating typescript, etc. that would’ve been trivial to do in react. React thankfully has none of these issues as the proper tooling already exists and is well documented. The biggest issue with react is also it’s biggest strength. You can use it with pretty much any patterns or library you’d like. This means that it’s incredibly flexible, but also that it can be a bit of a hassle to pick the exactly right choice for your particular project. Personally, this has impacted me by having to pick (and explain to the team) between different store patterns, sub-frameworks, libraries, etc.. It also frequently happens that for some reason I had to end-up switching mid-development to a different pattern or library, because the one that was previously chosen had unfixable issues. This effort goes down dramatically over time though, and most teams will be okay with picking the most common choices (e.g. redux). All the react developer tools I used are great and a lot less buggy than the competition (looking at you, vue dev tools). All in all, it’s a solid choice for any project in need of a frontend framework. There’s even full-stack frameworks like blitz.js available for small to medium-size or MVP-style projects.


0
Shijie ZhouSingapore7 Ratings9 Reviews
Software Engineer. Warrior for authenticity. Unlearning my societal conditioning & documenting the journey. https://shijiezhou.com
1 month ago

It is because React is a half-assed library crafted for Facebook’s internal needs. They released it to the public for some unknown reason, but they really should’ve kept it for themselves. Before anyone would think so, I’m not some fledgling junior struggling with his first component. I’m a senior programmer with 22 years of professional experience. Most of it with Javascript and web technologies. I’ve been using Angular, Vue and React for years, and here’s my two cent. I found Angular very good, but very difficult. It does everything out of the box, but most coders - and beginners definitely - can’t grasp it. As of 2020 I consider it dead technology. Most people just can’t bother to invest months and months to wrap their heads around it. I spent four years with it as my bread and butter, but no matter how frantically I was reading tech articles, blogs and docs, I was always hopelessly lagging behind the newest version. Vue, on the other hand, is wonderful. It has 90% of Angular’s power, but without the ridiculous complexity and overengineering. It’s perfect for web projects, and it’s not getting in your way when you’re trying to build something.


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Sayak SarkarPune, India196 Ratings109 Reviews
Principal Software Engineer at Red Hat, open web evangelist and a friendly developer.
1 month ago
Great Documentation
Hard to Use
Performant
Highly Customizable
Bleeding Edge
Responsive Maintainers

One of the most powerful and flexible front-end libraries out there. I tend to compare React to bricks in real life. Just like civil engineers use bricks to construct any range of strong structures ranging from humble walls and pavements to massive buildings for commercial and residential purposes, in the hands of web developers React provides the essential building blocks to build any range of applications from simple personal websites to large scale highly complicated enterprise grade web solutions. Having used React over the years, there's very little that I can complain about React. The only con that I feel about React is the steep initial learning curve involved and the amount of time and effort it takes to build applications from scratch in React. These cons however, barely matter nowadays due to the availability of a plethora of awesome React based frameworks to easily bootstrap new applications from scratch.


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Alexandre DesrochesQuebec, Canada8 Ratings7 Reviews
Focusing mostly on JavaScript - Including Node JS, Electron, React, NextJS, HTML and CSS. I also use Autohotkey, Google Firebase, and basic PHP for Wordpress.
10 months ago
Great Documentation
Hard to Use

I learned Vanilla Javascript starting in febuary 2020 and did 4 projects with plain javascript since then. I got used to normal JS then, I though to myself it is time to learn the better front-end tools now and get started with React. So I started learning React 3 weeks ago (today is 2020-12-03). My first impressions is that React is very nice but also feels restrictive compared to vanilla js. Often I find myself wanting to go back to plain js because it was free from a fixed way of doing things. But in other scenarios I tell myself React is awesome for things like reusable dynamic Components. So I'm still not sure wether I prefer React or jsut plain javascript in general. One sure thing is that React is extremely well maintained and solid. I don't have any doubt on how good it is but I'm just not sure wether it really helps me compared to being already good with normal javascript.


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Erik LumosManhattan, New York23 Ratings11 Reviews
Creating amazing apps, websites and AI
June 22, 2020
Great Documentation
Performant
Easy to Use
Highly Customizable
Responsive Maintainers

React is great for very interactive experiences like search filters, dynamic forms, graphs and charts, and anything else where immediate interaction vastly improves the user experience. If you're writing a site with multiple pages, and any kind of interactivity (click, navigation, opening modals, etc.), React is a suitable option. - If you're writing a single page, with no navigation and just displaying information (you probably don't even need javascript), then React is an overload.


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John MunschSanta Fe, NM8 Ratings4 Reviews
10 months ago

Truly an antique in the era of Custom Elements and Shadow DOM both being built into every browser out there except IE11 (which I don't care a bit about). It's emulating things that don't need to be emulated because they can be done faster and better by the browser. The only advantage it has over newer component solutions (for example, LitElement) is that it more easily accommodates SSR. But if you're not going to use that, avoid this. Pick LitElement, Svelte, Vue, etc. instead.


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