react-native

A framework for building native applications using React

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Great Documentation68
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Highly Customizable46
Performant45
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Showing 1,033 Reviews

nikhil288248 Ratings56 Reviews
8 months ago
Great Documentation
Easy to Use
Responsive Maintainers

love React, so in love with React Native also. using from the past 2 years now. Pros. you can reuse the same business logic In both web and mobile apps, only need to change basically is render function ( no easy task though ). UI elements provided by react-native are native UI elements, not the web elements. you can use java or kotlin code via react bridge. CodeRush by Microsoft is a blessing in disguise. Cons. Mastering is easy but there are two types of mastery . one is as a framework and the second is the performance in react native. anyone can learn to develop using react-native but to get the best performance you have to work hard. flutter is a better choice nowadays but doesn't support code push and needs to learn dart.


1
weverkley
vishal-majhi24 Ratings39 Reviews
2 months ago

I am a React developer so it is pretty much obvious that I know about react-native and used it in almost all my react apps. After using this I can say it is a very powerful package for react development and without any second thought every developer should give this at least one try. Docs are very informative. Thanks to the community.


5
weverkley
mxd025
subhadippal66
rajrgb
Cpt-Ghost
Preveen RajKochi, Kerala, India58 Ratings49 Reviews
Software Engineer @bigbinary
3 months ago

I have worked on native Android development using Java, but it lacked the audience of iOS. Also, being a javascript developer, it was a learning curve to be uptodate with latest improvements in android studio. React Native found to be a bleeding edge tech that enabled me to work on a single javascript project just like react where I could cover up android as well as ios.


2
vishnuprasad-95
ajayesivan
sunith vs50 Ratings62 Reviews
Computer science student of Cochin university of science and technology.
19 days ago

In my opinion, the best way to write desktop or mobile apps is either to go with a native language or do web apps. I think frameworks like react-native, flutter, etc don't add a ton of value when compared to the tradeoffs they make. If your app can work as a web app ( or even a TWA ) great, but if you need access to some low-level API or need to crank the last but of performance out from it go with something like java, swift, or even C++. These frameworks make it look easy to make natives apps that are cross-compatible but it is just an illusion, at some point down the production line you will have to re-write all that you have made.


1
Zac10ck
rushabh1010155 Ratings82 Reviews
4 months ago

I have used this for cross-platform application with easy to understand and make changes we definitely don't have much changes when it comes to developing an application which supports cross-platform. As React-Native help creating the application which can be port of any web pages or even web applications. As some of the features are hard to integrate which could be notification as we can use other libraries which could be used for solving many issues but most of them are unstable. I mostly use this when i get some cross platform or native apps to be created.


1
whysorush
somerandompiggoUnited Kingdom7 Ratings6 Reviews
c is cool except when it is not
5 hours ago

Really an excellent library for mobile apps! The fact that it is web technology-based, but builds to native binaries means that you can leverage the best of both web and native worlds. Not to mention the fact that if you develop for Android and iOS, 99% of the time it works without any extra modifications. It really is awesome!


1
SomeRandom-Dev
Vishesh GuptaMohali, Punjab42 Ratings12 Reviews
I am a Mobile, Web, and UI/UX developer. Mobile Application Developer(React Native Specialitst)
2 months ago

This library is best for building applications if you know javascript, I have learned this library in just 15 days and I am currently working with it for the past 2 years. Yes, there are some drawbacks too, where this library doesn't have support on some features and is constrained to other small modules.


1
visheshagomic
oldCoder2978 Ratings81 Reviews
9 months ago
Great Documentation
Easy to Use
Responsive Maintainers

I have used this library for personal learning and I saw the following pros and cons : Pros : Well documented Strong community and dedicated use specific webpages, for example, navigation etc. Learning with expo is super easy and super fun, it saves from a lot of configuration setting on your local device. Learning through examples is excellent and you get hands-on very quick. can code component-specific code for ios and android differently even design too saves a lot of time as one code works for two major platforms Cons : setting up the environment and compiling native apps through SDEs can be little messy sometimes. Moving from web maybe little tricky as there are not enough examples for a few components. For new mobile application coders, there is not sufficient documentation for terminology, for example, stack navigator when you move from web to mobile development Navigation transitions are not that smooth as compared to native. Troubleshooting is difficult for beginners, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.


0
Emad Kheir121 Ratings132 Reviews
Full-stack Software Engineer
18 days ago
Bleeding Edge
Highly Customizable
Performant

I’ve developed and shipped a couple of React Native apps, and from my experience, React Native is good but not as good as React Web. The positive things about it are: - Similar to React Web - Uses JavaScript so you don’t have to learn a new language to develop mobile apps - Performance: definitely faster than its Hybrid alternatives (Cordova, Ionic, etc…) Negatives: - Performance: While it’s faster than other Hybrid frameworks, it’s still slow compared to Swift/Java - Lack of CSS: React native uses a custom styling syntax that’s in a nutshell, CSS but in JSON format, which isn’t the most IDE-friendly solution. - Styling inconsistencies: you need to test both variations of the app since sometimes, you might encounter some platform-specific UI bugs - Scalability: As your app becomes more complex, over time, you’ll have to encounter native code one way or another


0
Alexander RussellSaskatoon, Saskatchewan68 Ratings8 Reviews
1 year ago
Easy to Use
Highly Customizable
Performant
Great Documentation
Responsive Maintainers
Bleeding Edge

I can't say enough good things about this package. The programming feels very intuitive and web like, can reuse code across both apps, and you can create custom android/iOS styles/components. That said here are some issues that we've had along the way: - Save yourself the trouble and use native over expo. Expo is slower, has less customization, and migrating over can sometimes be a pain - Component libraries: some types of packages are easy to find great ones, others are either poorly maintained or you'll have to create your own - Upgrading can be a pain: while usually easy sometimes the best way to upgrade is to create a new project and copy things over - Ongoing development: many packages are continuing to be developed. Upgrading to breaking changes isn't uncommon


0

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