porcupine
npm i porcupine

porcupine

A NodeJS package to integrate development tools

by natuelabs

0.1.2 (see all)TypeScript:Not Found
npm i porcupine
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Porcupine

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A NodeJS package to integrate development tools.

Getting Started

Porcupine will help you to integrate development tools using NodeJS in an easy and fast way. Porcupine is currently supporting:

Github

  • Hooks
    • Issue created
    • Issue comment created
    • Repository push
    • Release published
  • Calls
    • Create issue
    • Update issue
    • Create issue comment
    • Assign issue user
    • Set commit status

Trello

  • Hooks
    • Card created
    • Card updated
    • Card comment created
    • Card attachment created
    • Card user assigned
  • Calls
    • Update card
    • Attach URL to card

Jenkins

  • Hooks
    • Commit built
  • Calls
    • Build job

Slack

  • Hooks
    • Command called
  • Calls
    • Send message

How to use it

The interaction with Porcupine will happen all via events, both to receive hooks or to make calls. All events with params and returns are listed on models/events.js.

To use it, just require Porcupine, init the configs, port to run and play with the events:

var porcupine = require( 'porcupine' );
var eventEmitter = porcupine.getEventEmitter();
var events = porcupine.getEvents();

var config = {
  github : {
    oauthToken : 'your-token',
    secret : 'your-secret'
  },
  trello : {
    key : 'your-key',
    token : 'your-token',
    secret : 'your-secret',
    callBackUrl : 'https://your-porcupine-url/trello'
  }
};

// By default Porcupine will run over the port 3000
porcupine.init( config, 3000 );

function handleTrelloCardCreated ( data ) {
  // Create issue on GitHub
  eventEmitter.emit(
    events.github.issue.create,
    {
      owner : 'your_repo_owner',
      repo : 'your_repo_name',
      title : data.title
    },
    function ( err, response ) {
      if ( err ) {
        console.log( response );
      }
    }
  );
}

// Card created on Trello
eventEmitter.on(
  events.trello.card.created,
  handleTrelloCardCreated
);

Config

To use Porcupine the first action is to send the config object and optionally the port to run (if not sent, Porcupine will listen to the port 3000):

porcupine.init( config, 3000 );

The configs will also enable each one of the integrations so, if not setted, the integration is not enabled:

GitHub

var config = {
  github : {
    oauthToken : 'your-token',
    secret : 'create-your-own-secret'
  }
};

Trello

var config = {
  trello : {
    key : 'your-key',
    token : 'your-token'
    secret : 'your-secret',
    callBackUrl : 'https://your-porcupine-url/trello'
  }
};

Jenkins

var config = {
  jenkins : {
    baseUrl : 'https://your-jenkins-url.com',
    user : 'jenkins-user',
    pass : 'jenkins-pass',
    secret : 'create-your-own-secret'
  }
};

Slack

var config = {
  slack : {
    incomingHookUrl : 'https://slack-incoming-hook-url.com'
    token : 'your-token'
  }
};

Hooks

To use hooks you have to create them for Trello and GitHub. The easiest way is to create a dedicated user at those services and create the hooks with this user. A helpful tool to make the API calls is DHCS. To receive the hooks your installation have to be avaiable in the internet, an easy way to develop locally is by using Ngrok.

GitHub hooks

You can find more information about GitHub hooks here.

Method: POST
URL: https://api.github.com/repos/:owner:/:repo:/hooks
Header: "Authorization: token :token:"

Body:

{
  "name": "web",
  "active": true,
  "events": [
    "push",
    "issues",
    "issue_comment",
    "commit_comment",
    "pull_request",
    "pull_request_review_comment",
    "release"
  ],
  "config": {
    "url": "https://:your_installation_url:/github",
    "content_type": "json",
    "insecure_ssl": "1",
    "secret": "your-secret"
  }
}

List hooks

Method: GET
URL: https://api.github.com/repos/:owner:/:repo:/hooks
Header: "Authorization: token :token:"

Delete hook

Method: DELETE
URL: https://api.github.com/repos/:owner:/:repo:/hooks/:hook_id:
Header: "Authorization: token :token:"

Observations

  • Accepts self-signed certificates if you send the "insecure_ssl" config;
  • It's possible to use a different port than 443 for HTTPS on hooks;

Trello hooks

You can find more information about Trello hooks here.

Method: GET
URL: https://trello.com/1/connect?key=:key:&name=Porcupine&response_type=token&scope=read,write&expiration=never
  • Get the board ID. The hash in the URL of the board is the short ID:
Method: GET
URL: https://trello.com/1/board/:short_id:
Method: POST
URL: https://trello.com/1/tokens/:token:/webhooks/?key=:key:

There is a Trello bug with this API call that forces you to send some headers:

Accept: application/json
Content-Type: application/json

Body:

{
  "description": "Porcupine",
  "callbackURL": "https://:your_installation_url:/trello",
  "idModel": ":model_id:"
}

List hooks

Method: GET
URL: https://trello.com/1/tokens/:token:/webhooks/?key=:key:

Delete hook

Method: DELETE
URL: https://trello.com/1/tokens/:token:/webhooks/:hook_id:/?key=:key:

Observations

  • Accepts self-signed certificates;
  • It's not possible to use a different port than 443 for HTTPS on hooks;

Jenkins hooks

Jenkins hooks have to be called inside your job script.

Porcupine is expecting two headers:

  • x-jenkins-signature: A sha1 hmac hash of the content using the configured secret on config.secret
  • x-jenkins-event: A string that defines the hook event

Events

The supported events are:

  • commit: This event is used for continuous integration and should contain the commit hash, the status of the build, job name and the build URL, for example:
{
    "commit" : "574607f5e8a49a2c82475737484f193856d4b430",
    "status" : true,
    "job" : "job-name",
    "buildUrl" : "https://jenkins-url/job/job-name/1"
}

Possible statuses are: pending, success, error and failure

How to do it

Here goes an example using bash:

SECRET="your-secret"

LOAD="{\"commit\":\"${COMMIT}\",\"status\":\"pending\",\"job\":\"${JOB_NAME}\",\"buildUrl\":\"${BUILD_URL}\"}"
SECURITY=`echo -n $LOAD | openssl sha1 -hmac $SECRET | sed 's/^.* //'`
curl -d $LOAD -H "Content-Type: application/json" -H "x-jenkins-signature: ${SECURITY}" -H "x-jenkins-event: commit" https://your-porcupine-url/jenkins

ant build

if [ $? -eq 0 ]
then
    STATUS="success"
else
    STATUS="failure"
fi

LOAD="{\"commit\":\"${COMMIT}\",\"status\":\"${STATUS}\",\"job\":\"${JOB_NAME}\",\"buildUrl\":\"${BUILD_URL}\"}"
SECURITY=`echo -n $LOAD | openssl sha1 -hmac $SECRET | sed 's/^.* //'`
curl -d $LOAD -H "Content-Type: application/json" -H "x-jenkins-signature: ${SECURITY}" -H "x-jenkins-event: commit" https://your-porcupine-url/jenkins

Slack hooks

You can configure slack commands to call Porcupine and for that you just have to configure the token and add the URL to Slack:

https://:your_installation_url:/slack?porcupine-event=command

IMPORTANT: The hook from Slack can receive an answer so the callback registered to this hook will receive a response on the data and the response have to be done:

data.response.send();

You can also setup an Incoming WebHooks on Slack and use Porcupine to send messages, just add the hook URL to the configuration.

Example

To see how we use Porcupine just check our implementation at natuelabs/our-porcupine.

Downloads/wk

10

GitHub Stars

10

LAST COMMIT

7yrs ago

MAINTAINERS

1

CONTRIBUTORS

4

OPEN ISSUES

1

OPEN PRs

0
VersionTagPublished
0.1.2
latest
8yrs ago
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