j2j

j2j

CLI tool to convert JS to JSON

Showing:

Popularity

Downloads/wk

1

GitHub Stars

0

Maintenance

Last Commit

7yrs ago

Contributors

0

Package

Dependencies

7

Size (min+gzip)

28.8KB

License

MIT

Type Definitions

Tree-Shakeable

No?

Categories

Readme

j2j

NPM

j2j is a command-line utility to convert JavaScript to JSON.

It works best on plain ol' JavaScript objects, but anything that JSON.stringify() consumes should work as well.

I wrote this because I often need to convert fairly static JS objects into .json files. For example, taking the contents of a Gruntfile.js's config and putting them into individual task files (a la load-grunt-config).

Alternatively, you could do something like this by pasting the JS into a node console:

$ node
> console.log(JSON.stringify({
...   main: [
...     'Gruntfile.js',
...     '<%= mochacov.options.files %>'
...   ],
...   options: {
.....     jshintrc: true
.....   }
... }, null, 2));

...and copy/paste the output. However, I wanted something automated (which I can integrate into my IDE).

This tool is not for converting 1,000 lines of JavaScript into JSON, though you could try.

Example

$ j2j -o out.json <<EOF 
{
  main: [
    'Gruntfile.js',
    '<%= mochacov.options.files %>'
  ],
  options: {
    jshintrc: true
  }
}
EOF 
$ cat out.json
{
  "main": [
    "Gruntfile.js",
    "<%= mochacov.options.files %>"
  ],
  "options": {
    "jshintrc": true
  }
}

Usage

If no string is given and option --file is not used, j2j reads from STDIN.

For shorter inputs:

echo "input" | j2j [options]
j2j ["input"] [options] 

If input is specified, it should be wrapped in quotes or double-quotes, unless you use the following method.

For longer inputs, I recommend:

j2j [options] <<EOF
input
EOF

Caveats

  • An input of foo will fail, because that appears to be a variable to the parser. Use 'foo' instead.
  • The JavaScript you use as input is evaluated which means your code gets executed. Thus, if your input is 2 + 2, the JSON output will be 4. You could probably do all sorts of terrible and wonderful things with that.
  • Don't worry, it's evaluated in a sandbox.

All Options

  • -f, --file: Read file instead of accepting a string.
  • -o, --output: Output to file instead of STDOUT.
  • -C, --color: Do not output color under any circumstances. Default: false
  • -i, --indent: Indentation level. Default: 2
  • -l, --line-nos: Display line numbers. Default: false
  • -h, --help: Display help
  • -v, --version: Display version
  • --debug: Debug mode

More Examples

Write to a file:

j2j > foo.json <<EOF
{foo: 'bar'}
EOF

Read from a file, and write to another file:

j2j --file foo.js --output foo.json

Programmatic Usage

j2j(input, opts, callback)

Parses and generates output from a string. Fulfills with output.

For programmatic use. If for some reason you pass it a non-string, it will just give you output, which is a shortcut for JSON.stringify().

Parameters

input: string, String to parse

opts: Object, See options

callback: function, Optional callback if you don't want to use Promises.

Returns: Promise, See Q docs

Example:

var j2j = require('j2j');

j2j("{foo: 'bar', baz: 2}", {indent: false})
  .then(function(output) {
    expect(output).to.equal('{"foo":"bar","baz":2}');
  });

j2j.parse(s, opts, callback)

Attempts to parse a string into JSONable.

If you pass something like {foo: 'bar'} into JSON.stringify(), it will of course return "{foo: 'bar'}" because you gave it a string. We need to give JSON.stringify() some actual JavaScript. So we attempt to evaluate the string as JS within a sandbox. Because it's evaluated, you can actually put expressions in it, call functions, etc., as long as everything is defined.

Parameters

s: String, Raw string to evaluate

opts: Object | function, See options. Callback if function.

callback: function, Callback to call with results from evaluation, if you don't like Promises.

Returns: Promise, See Q docs

j2j.output(o, opts)

Given a JS variable, stringify it, with optional color

This function is synchronous.

Parameters

o: Object | Array | string | number, Thing to stringify and output.

opts: Object, Options. See options

Returns: string

j2j.options(opts, opts.debug, opts.indent, opts.no-color, opts.line-nos)

Merge options object with default options.

Parameters

opts: Object | function, Options! If function, ignored.

opts.debug: boolean, Debug mode?

opts.indent: number, How many spaces to indent JSON output

opts.no-color: boolean, No colors? Even a little? false in programmatic usage; true otherwise.

opts.line-nos: boolean, Display line numbers?

Returns: Object

j2j.write(input, opts, callback)

Parses and generates output from a string, then writes the output somewhere.

Used by CLI. Exits with nonzero code if error and callback is NOT specified.

Parameters

input: string, String to parse

opts: Object | function, See options. Callback if function.

callback: function, Optional callback if you don't want to use Promises.

Returns: Promise, See Q docs

Author

Christopher Hiller

License

MIT

Rate & Review

Great Documentation0
Easy to Use0
Performant0
Highly Customizable0
Bleeding Edge0
Responsive Maintainers0
Poor Documentation0
Hard to Use0
Slow0
Buggy0
Abandoned0
Unwelcoming Community0
100