@team-supercharge/nest-amqp
npm i @team-supercharge/nest-amqp

@team-supercharge/nest-amqp

Nest AMQP 1.0 module - NPM package: https://www.npmjs.com/package/@team-supercharge/nest-amqp

by team-supercharge

3.2.1 (see all)License:MITTypeScript:Not Found
npm i @team-supercharge/nest-amqp
Readme

Nest AMQP 1.0 Module

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Description

AMQP 1.0 module for Nest. It is based on the rhea-promise package. This package is for working with a message broker with extra data validation functionality. It uses the class-transformer and class-validator packages to transform and validate the payload of the messages. With this we can easily verify the message's payload structure and its data types with Data Transfer Objects. Besides, it gives control over the message how to handle it: accept, reject or release.

Installation

$ npm install --save @team-supercharge/nest-amqp

To use the library, the peer dependencies must also be installed:

$ npm install --save class-transformer class-validator

Usage

In the following subsections you can see how to send and receive messages, how to handle message transfer and how to use DTO classes for message payload transformation and validation.

Module import and connection options

To create a connection, you have to set the connection details. The library provides an easy way to set the connection details via a string connection URI. The library will parse this connection URI and set the appropriate connection options. Besides, you can add your custom connection options or other library settings with the module options.

Connection URI

This library provides an easier way to set the connection options with a connection URI: you can describe the connection settings with a URL. The library will parse the URL and set the corresponding options. Here you can see the description of the URL:

protocol://[username:password@]host:port

The username and password components are optional, with these you can set the authentication credentials to the message queue server.

Note: if you would like to use special characters in username or password, then you have to encodeURIComponent() these values, because the library will decode the values right before connection creation. If you don't encode these values, then you will get a URL parse error.

If you use environment variables to connection username or password, then use the env values with encodeURIComponent() as well.

Example:

const username = encodeURIComponent('Jörg');
const password = encodeURIComponent('Gt|N#R=6$5(TE@rH"Pvc$7a');
const connectionUri = `amqps://${username}:${password}@localhost:5672`;

You can set custom protocol which will set the connection transport automatically, so you don't have to add the transport to the connection options object. The protocol can be:

  • amqp: in this case the transport will be tcp
  • amqps: in this case the transport will be ssl
  • amqp+ssl: in this case the transport will be ssl
  • amqp+tls: in this case the transport will be tls

Examples:

  • amqp://localhost:5672
  • amqps://user:password@my-server.com:5672
  • amqp+tls://admin:secret@127.0.0.1:5672

Create connection

To create a connection, you have to import the QueueModule.forRoot() module into your application's root module. The forRoot() static method has multiple parameters:

  • for single connection:
    • the first and required is either the connection URI string, or the module configuration object
    • the optional second parameter is the module and connection configuration object sans the connection URI, if you provided the URI as a first parameter
  • for multiple connections:
    • the first and required parameter is an array of connection configuration objects
    • the optional second parameter is the module configuration object

To see the available module options, scroll down. Here are some simple examples:

// for single connection

import { Module } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueModule } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRoot('amqp://user:password@localhost:5672'),
    // or alternatively
    // QueueModule.forRoot({ connectionUri: 'amqp://user:password@localhost:5672' }),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}
// for multiple connections

import { Module } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueModule } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRoot([
      { connectionUri: 'amqp://user1:password1@localhost:5671' },
      { connectionUri: 'amqp://user2:password2@localhost:5672', name: Connections.WORKER },
    ]),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Create connection with asynchronous module configuration

Generally we are using environment variables to configure our application. Nest provides the ConfigService to use these env variables nicely. If you would like to configure the AMQP module with env variables, or you are using another asynchronous way to get the configuration, then you have to use the forRootAsync() static method instead of forRoot() on the QueueModule class. To see the available module options, scroll down. Here is an example:

Note: the @team-supercharge/nest-amqp package does not support multiple connection on asynchronous module configuration!

import { Module } from '@nestjs/common';
import { ConfigModule, ConfigService } from '@nestjs/config';
import { QueueModule, QueueModuleOptions } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRootAsync({
      imports: [ConfigModule],
      useFactory: (configService: ConfigService): QueueModuleOptions => ({
        connectionUri: configService.get<string>('AMQP_CONNECTION_URI'),
        connectionOptions: {
          transport: configService.get<string>('AMQP_CONNECTION_TRANSPORT'),
        }
      }),
      inject: [ConfigService],
    }),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Instead of useFactory you can use useClass or useExisting to set module options. You can see the examples in the test file.

Module options

The module options object needs to be added to the forRoot() or forRootAsync() static method. The possible options can be these:

  • isGlobal?: A boolean value. If this property is true, then you can skip the import with.forFeature() method in the feature modules, because the public services will be available in all modules which imports the root module. Default value is false. (You can read more about it on Nest modules page)
  • logger?: A custom object or class instance which implements the LoggerService interface from the @nestjs/common package. With this option, you can use your own logging method to log information in @team-supercharge/nest-amqp library. If it is not set then the library will use Nest's Logger service to logging. You can see a full example below in the readme. Default value is undefined.
  • throwExceptionOnConnectionError?: A boolean value. If it's true then QueueModule will throw forward the exception which occurs during the connection creation. Default value is false.
  • connectionUri?: It is an optional string property. This is required only when you are use the forRootAsync() method or the forRoot() method for single connection with only an object argument.
  • connectionOptions?: It is an optional object. With this you can set Rhea's connection options which will be passed to the Connection object during connection creation. The default value is {}.

First basic example:

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRoot(
      'amqp://user:password@localhost:5672',
      {
        isGlobal: true,
        throwExceptionOnConnectionError: true,
        connectionOptions: {
          transport: 'tcp'
        }
      }
    ),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Second example with asynchronous configuration:

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRootAsync({
      // in case of `QueueModule.forRootAsync`, isGlobal property goes here and
      // not into the object returned by 'useFactory' or 'useClass' or 'useExisting'
      isGlobal: true,
      imports: [ConfigModule],
      useFactory: (configService: ConfigService): QueueModuleOptions => ({
        connectionUri: configService.get<string>('AMQP_CONNECTION_URI'),
        throwExceptionOnConnectionError: true,
        connectionOptions: {
          transport: configService.get<string>('AMQP_CONNECTION_TRANSPORT'),
        }
      }),
      inject: [ConfigService],
    }),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Custom logger

You can use your own logger solution in the library. To do this, you have to create a class which implements the LoggerService interface from the @nestjs/common package. After that you can add the class instance to the module options, and the logging will work with your custom solution. The @team-supercharge/nest-amqp library will use this one instance/object to log everything inside, so it is good if you use the context argument in the log methods to determine who is logging currently. Here is an example:

import { LoggerService, Module } from "@nestjs/common";

class MyLogger implements LoggerService {
  public log(message: any, context: string): void {
    console.log(`[${context}] ${message}`);
  }
  public error(message: any, trace: string, context: string): void {
    console.error(`[${context}] ${message}`);
  }
  public warn(message: any, context: string): void {
    console.warn(`[${context}] ${message}`);
  }
  public debug(message: any, context: string): void {
    console.debug(`[${context}] ${message}`);
  }
  public verbose(message: any, context: string): void {
    console.log(`[${context}] ${message}`);
  }
}

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRoot(
      'amqp://user:password@localhost:5672',
      {
        logger: new MyLogger()
      }
    ),
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Send a message

Single connection

You can send messages with the QueueService. First you have to inject the service instance in the constructor, then you can use it to send a message. Here is an example:

import { Injectable } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueService } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

@Injectable()
export class TestService {
  constructor(private readonly queueService: QueueService) {}

  public async sendMessage(): Promise<void> {
    const payload = { text: 'hello world', date: new Date() };
    await this.queueService.send<TestDto>('example', payload);
  }
}

In the example we send a message to the example queue with an object payload. The QueueService will stringify the object and send the message with the stringified object as payload. You can add a DTO class as generic type to the send<T>() method and TypeScript will check that the second argument is matches with the DTO class.

Note: the send<T>() method won't validate and transform the payload, it only stringifies the payload to a string value and send objects as string payload.

The send<T>() method's third parameter is the options which is an optional object. You can set here the rhea connection options as well. Other custom available options:

  • schedule.divideMinute?: Send the message multiple times a minute given by this number.
  • schedule.cron?: Send the message multiple times given by this standard cron string.
  • schedule.afterSeconds?: Message sending delay in seconds.

Multiple connections

Sending messages with multiple connections works mostly the same, the only difference is that we need to define to which connection do we want to send the message. Here is an example:

import { Injectable } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueService } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

import { Connections } from './constants';

@Injectable()
export class TestService {
  constructor(private readonly queueService: QueueService) {}

  public async sendMessage(): Promise<void> {
    const payload = { text: 'hello world', date: new Date() };

    await this.queueService.send<TestDto>('example', payload, Connections.TEST);
  }

  public async sendDelayedMessage(): Promise<void> {
    const payload = { text: 'hello world', date: new Date() };
    const sendOptions = { schedule: { afterSeconds: 10 } };

    await this.queueService.send<TestDto>('example', payload, sendOptions, Connections.TEST);
  }
}

Note: It is assumed that there is an enum named Connections, and the connections defined in the forRoot method contains a connection named Connections.TEST.

Note: If you leave out the name of the connection, it will be sent a to the default connection (if exists).

Listen to a queue

Single connection

If you want to receive the messages which arrive at a queue then you have to listen on the specific queue. You can do this with the @Listen() decorator which you can add to a method of a class which has the @Injectable() decorator. Here is an example:

@Injectable()
export class ExampleListener {
  @Listen('example', { type: PayloadDto })
  public async listenForQueueMessages(data: PayloadDto, control: MessageControl): Promise<void> {
    console.log('new message arrived on the "example" queue:', data);
  }
}

The @Listen() decorator's first parameter is the name of the queue, which we are listening to. When a new message arrives, this method will be invoked with 2 arguments in order: message payload and message control. The message payload is a Data Transfer Object (DTO) class's instance. The task of this DTO class is to describe the payload's data structure for validation and transformation. We do this with decorators. The second argument is the message control object which gives control how to handle the message transfer.

The @Listen() decorator has a second argument which is the options object. The options object can have these optional properties:

  • type?: A class reference which is decorated with class-transformer and class-validator decorators. The data validation and transformation will be done with this class.

    Note: if type is not provided, the incoming message will not be processed, and the handler will not receive the message, but null instead

  • skipValidation?: if it is true then the message payload won't be validated and transformed by the type property's value. The default value is false.
  • acceptValidationNullObjectException?: A boolean value. If it's true then QueueModule will accept the message when a ValidationNullObjectException error is thrown during message transformation and validation. (ValidationNullObjectException will be thrown when message body is null). Otherwise the message will be rejected on ValidationNullObjectException error. Default value is false.
  • parallelMessageProcessing?: The most number of messages that should be processed at the same time. The default value is 1.
  • transformerOptions?: class-transformer options
  • validatorOptions?: class-validator options

Multiple connections

Listening for messages with multiple connections works mostly the same, the only difference is that we need to define on which connection are we listening for messages. Here is an example:

@Injectable()
export class ExampleListener {
  @Listen('example', Connections.INTERNAL)
  public async listenForInternalTicks(_tick: unknown, control: MessageControl): Promise<void> {
    console.log(`new tick arrived on the "example" queue on connection ${Connections.INTERNAL}:`, data);
  }

  @Listen('example', { type: PayloadDto }, Connections.WORKER)
  public async listenForWorkerMessages(data: PayloadDto, control: MessageControl): Promise<void> {
    console.log(`new message arrived on the "example" queue on connection ${Connections.WORKER}:`, data);
  }
}

Note: It is assumed that there is an enum named Connections, and the connections defined in the forRoot method contains a connection named Connections.INTERNAL and Connections.WORKER.

Note: If you leave out the name of the connection, the listener will be attached to the default connection (if exists).

Message control

When a new message arrives at a queue, the assigned method with @Listen() decorator receives the transformed and validated message body and the message control. The latter object is to control the message transfer. It is possible to accept, reject or release the transfer. Here are the examples:

// accept the message
control.accept();

// reject the message
control.reject('processing failed');

// release the message
control.release();

Use accept when message has been handled normally. It will remove the message from the queue. Use reject when message was unprocessable. It contained either malformed or semantically incorrect data. In other words it can't be successfully processed in the future without modifications. It will remove the message from the queue. Use release when a temporary problem happened during message handling, e.g. could not save record to DB, 3rd party service errored, etc. The message is not malformed and theoretically can be processed at a later time without modifications. The message will not be removed from the queue but will be processed by another consumer.

If the message was not handled manually and the method with @Listen() decorator executed successfully then the message will be accepted. If the message was not handled manually and there was an Error or Exception then the message will be rejected automatically.

Note relating to ActiveMQ: Active MQ current version (5.16.2 as of this writing) does not differentiate between release and reject, both will be understood as release.

Payload validation and transformation

The module provides an opportunity for adding transformation and validation process to the message payload. With transformation, we can set what properties are important for us and what properties should be skipped during the transformation. With validation, we can check that the payload has the expected properties with valid values.

Here is an example DTO class:

import { Exclude, Expose, Transform } from 'class-transformer';
import { IsIn, IsDateString, IsString } from 'class-validator';

@Exclude()
export class LogEntryDto {
  @Expose()
  @IsString()
  public readonly message: string;

  @Expose()
  @IsDateString()
  @Transform(value => new Date(value), { toClassOnly: true })
  public readonly date: Date;

  @Expose()
  @IsIn([1, 2, 3, 4, 5])
  public readonly level: number;

  constructor(props: Partial<LogEntryDto>) {
    Object.assign(this, props);
  }
}

The @Expose() decorator says that after the transformation, the properties with this decorator should stay in the LogEntryDto class instance. The DTO class has an @Exclude() decorator which means that the properties that are not described in the class definition or don't have @Expose() decorator will be removed from the resulting instance during the transformation . With these 2 decorators we can specify which properties we want from the payload when the message arrives at the consumer side.

The @Transform() decorator is to manually cast or transform a value during the transformation process. In the example we can see that when the message arrives, the body will contain a JSON object which is converted to string. The stringified JSON object has only primitive values so the date property will be a string date. We want it as a Date object instance, so we manually transform it into a Date object with the @Transform() decorator. We have to notice that only when the payload will be transformed to the DTO object (i.e. when the message arrives at the consumer side) and not when the object will be transformed to a string (i.e. before the sending on the producer side), because the DTO object will be represented as a string in the message payload. The other decorators are to validate the property values.

An object payload's lifetime during the whole sending-receiving process:

                                        send                               receive
Message's way:     sender (producer)  --------->  queue (message broker)  --------->  receiver (consumer)
                                      transform                           transform
Payload's format:   DTO instance or   --------->          string          --------->     DTO instance
                   JavaScript object

You can see that the sender sends a DTO object instance or a plain object which will be converted to string and the message broker receives this string as message body. When the consumer gets the message, the body is a string and the transformation process will transform it into a DTO instance. Only one thing left: set this DTO class as message payload:

@Listen('logsQueue', { type: LogEntryDto })
public async listenForLogsQueueMessages(data: LogEntryDto): Promise<void> {
  console.log('log entry:', data);
}

You can send any other primitive values as message payload but in this case you have to take care to disable the validation and transformation process. Here is the example:

@Listen('stringQueue', { type: String, skipValidation: true })
public async listenForStringQueueMessages(data: string): Promise<void> {
  console.log('message payload:', data);
}

Note: Defining type is required if we want to receive primitive values as the message.

Module logs

The module uses debug package for logging. If you start the Nest application with the DEBUG environment variable, then you can set the level of logging:

# log everything
$ DEBUG=nest-amqp:* nest start

# log only the errors
$ DEBUG=nest-amqp:error:* nest start

Shutdown

If you stop your application, then Nest will wait for the end of the currently processing messages and will exit after the processes finished.

Example

First you have to import the Queue module into the app module. The QueueModule.forRoot() method's first parameter is the connection URI for the message broker server:

Note: the QueueModule.forRoot() can be added only to the application's root module and only once

import { QueueModule } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';
// ...

@Module({
  imports: [
    QueueModule.forRoot('amqp://user:password@localhost:5672'),
    // ...
  ],
})
export class AppModule {}

Then create a user.module.ts feature module what will give all the functionality which belongs to the users.

Note: the QueueModule.forFeature() module must be imported to each feature module of the application.

import { Module } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueModule } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

@Module({
  imports: [QueueModule.forFeature()],
  controllers: [],
  providers: [],
})
export class UserModule {}

Import this UserModule in the AppModule.

After that create the user.dto.ts file and add a data transfer object (DTO) class to it which will be sent as body in the queue message. The class-transformer package is used to transform (rename, remove, alter type, etc...) the object properties before sending it to / after receiving it from the queue and the class-validator package is used to validate the received object on the consumer side:

import { Expose } from 'class-transformer';
import { IsInt, IsString } from 'class-validator';

@Expose()
export class AddUserDto {
  @IsString()
  public readonly name: string;

  @IsInt()
  public readonly age: number;

  constructor(userData: AddUserDto) {
    Object.assign(this, userData);
  }
}

After that create the user.listener.ts file and add a new listener class to it which has a method with the @Listen() decorator to listen the specified queue's messages:

Note: you can add the @Listen() decorator for any class which have the @Injectable() decorator.

import { Injectable } from '@nestjs/common';
import { Listen, MessageControl } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

import { AddUserDto } from './user.dto';

@Injectable()
export class UserListener {
  @Listen('addUser', { type: AddUserDto })
  public async listenForQueueNameMessages(data: AddUserDto, control: MessageControl): Promise<void> {
    console.log('new message arrived on the "addUser" queue:', data);
    control.accept();
  }
}

Then we create a user.controller.ts file and add a HTTP endpoint which will send the message to the queue with the payload what it gets as HTTP body:

import { Body, Controller, Post } from '@nestjs/common';
import { QueueService } from '@team-supercharge/nest-amqp';

import { AddUserDto } from './user.dto';

@Controller('user')
export class UserController {
  constructor(private readonly queueService: QueueService) {}

  @Post()
  public async sendAddUserMessage(@Body() body: AddUserDto): Promise<string> {
    await this.queueService.send<AddUserDto>('addUser', body);

    return 'Add user message sent';
  }
}

We can see that the send() method is responsible to add a message to the given queue.

The last thing is to add this controller to the corresponding module:

import { UserController } from './user.controller';
import { UserListener } from './user.listener';
// ...

@Module({
  controllers: [UserController],
  providers: [UserListener],
})
export class UserModule {}

Finally, start the app with npm run start and it will listen on http://localhost:4444 URL. You can test the functionality with sample HTTP requests which are in the examples/01-Basic_Connection/http-requests/add-user.http file.

License

@team-supercharge/nest-amqp is MIT licensed.

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