@originjs/crypto-js-wasm
@originjs/crypto-js-wasm
npm i @originjs/crypto-js-wasm
@originjs/crypto-js-wasm

@originjs/crypto-js-wasm

An alternative to crypto-js implemented with WebAssembly and ESM

by originjs

1.1.0 (see all)License:MulanPSL2TypeScript:Built-In
npm i @originjs/crypto-js-wasm
Readme

@originjs/crypto-js-wasm

Build Status Version

English | 中文


crypto-js-wasm is a javascript library of crypto standards. Inspired by crypto-js, but now powered by WebAssembly.

  • Safe: The process of encryption is fully enclosed and invisible thanks to WebAssembly
  • Efficient: Up to 16x faster than crypto-js (see Benchmark)
  • Compatible: Has the same API with crypto-js
  • Browser & Nodejs: Support both browser and nodejs
  • Versatile: 15+ crypto standards supported, including MD5, SHA-x, AES, RC4, etc
  • ESM: Written in ESM, build as UMD for compatibility

What's new

We have supported RSA and TypeScript now!

Getting started

npm install @originjs/crypto-js-wasm

or

pnpm install @originjs/crypto-js-wasm

or

yarn add @originjs/crypto-js-wasm

Usage

Note that the async function loadWasm() should be called once (and once only!) for each algorithm that will be used, unless loadAllWasm() is called at the very beginning.

import CryptoJSW from 'crypto-js-wasm';

// (Optional) load all wasm files
await CryptoJSW.loadAllWasm();

// Async/Await syntax
await CryptoJSW.MD5.loadWasm();
const rstMD5 = CryptoJSW.MD5('message').toString();
console.log(rstMD5);

// Promise syntax
CryptoJSW.SHA256.loadWasm().then(() => {
    const rstSHA256 = CryptoJSW.SHA256('message').toString();
    console.log(rstSHA256);
})

Please note that HMAC does not have a loadWasm, as a hasher must be specified if you want to use HMAC (i.e. HmacSHA1).

And the loadWasm in pbkdf2 only calls SHA1.loadWasm as SHA1 is the default hasher of pbkdf2. If you specified another hasher, the corresponding loadWasm of the hasher should be called repectly. Same case in evpkdf/MD5 as MD5 is the default hasher of evpkdf.

Usage of RSA

Please refer to this document.

Available standards

  • MD5 / HmacMD5
  • SHA1 / HmacSHA1
  • SHA224 / HmacSHA224
  • SHA256 / HmacSHA256
  • SHA384 / HmacSHA384
  • SHA512 / HmacSHA512
  • SHA3 / HmacSHA3
  • RIPEMD160 / HmacRIPEMD160
  • PBKDF2
  • EvpKDF

  • AES
  • Blowfish
  • DES
  • TripleDES
  • Rabbit
  • RabbitLegacy
  • RC4
  • RC4Drop
  • RSA

Benchmark

The benchmark below is run on a desktop PC (i5-4590, 16 GB RAM, Windows 10 Version 21H2 (OSBuild 19044, 1466)).

Chrome 102.0.5005.63:

benchmark_chrome

Firefox 101.0:

benchmark_firefox

Nodejs v16.6.4:

nodejs

RSA(vs jsencrypt) in Chrome:

rsa_chrome

Development

# install dependencies
pnpm install

# build for production
pnpm run build

# run all tests
pnpm run test

# run all tests with coverage
pnpm run coverage

Why do we need an async loadWasm call?

This is because the WebAssembly binary needs to be load by WebAssembly.instantiate, and it is async.

The async WebAssembly.instantiate is recommended instead of its sync variant WebAssembly.instance, and in many cases the WebAssembly.instance can not load WebAssembly binary whose size is not small enough.

Why do we store wasm binaries in base64-encoded chars?

This is because crypto-js-wasm may be used in browser or nodejs. This is relative elegant implementation comparing with wasm loader in browser(powered by webpack, vite or something else) or fs in nodejs.

License

Distributed under the Mulan Permissive Software License

Downloads/wk

24

GitHub Stars

93

LAST COMMIT

3mos ago

MAINTAINERS

5

CONTRIBUTORS

28

OPEN ISSUES

0

OPEN PRs

0
VersionTagPublished
1.1.0
latest
1mo ago
No alternatives found
No tutorials found
Add a tutorial

Rate & Review

100
No reviews found
Be the first to rate