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@nksaraf/nsh
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@nksaraf/nsh

Coat your shell scripts in something a bit more beautiful

by Glen Maddern

0.0.3 (see all)License:MITTypeScript:Built-In
npm i @nksaraf/nsh
Readme

Shellac

A tool to make invoking a series of shell commands safer & better-looking.

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Usage

import shellac from 'shellac'

test('morty', async () => await shellac`
  $ echo "End-to-end CLI testing made nice"
  $ node -p "5 * 9"
  stdout >> ${ answer => expect(Number(answer)).toBeGreaterThan(40) }
`)

Syntax

Basic commands

await shellac`
  // To execute a command, use $
  $ my command here  
  
  // If you want the output piped through to process.stdout/err, use $$
  $$ echo "This command will print to terminal"
  
  // Use stdout/err and >> to check the output of the last command
  stdout >> ${ last_cmd_stdout => {
    expect(last_cmd_stdout).toBe("This command will print to terminal")
  }}
`

Returning output

Shellac returns the stdout/err of the last command in a block as { stdout, stderr }

const { stdout, stderr } = await shellac`
  $ echo "This command will run but its output will be lost"
  $ echo "The last command executed returns its stdout/err"
`
expect(stdout).toBe("The last command executed returns its stdout/err")

You can also return named captures from a series of commands:

const { current_sha, current_branch } = await shellac`
  $ git rev-parse --short HEAD
  stdout >> current_sha

  $ git rev-parse --abbrev-ref HEAD
  stdout >> current_branch
`

Branching

You can use if ${ ... } { ... } else { ... } to run conditionally based on the value of an interpolation:

await shellac`
  if ${ process.env.CLEAN_RUN } {
    $ yarn create react-app
  } else {
    $ git reset --hard
    $ git clean -df
  }
  
  $$ npx fab init -y
  // ...
`

Changing directory

You can either use an in directive:

await shellac`
  // Change directory for the duration of the block:
  in ${ __dirname } {
    $ pwd
    stdout >> ${ cwd => expect(cwd).toBe(__dirname) }
  }
  
  // By default we run in process.cwd()
  $ pwd
  stdout >> ${ cwd => expect(cwd).toBe(process.cwd()) }
`

If the whole script needs to run in one place, use shellac.in(dir):

import tmp from 'tmp-promise'
const dir = await tmp.dir()

await shellac.in(dir.path)`
  $ pwd
  stdout >> ${ cwd => expect(cwd).toBe(dir.path) }
`

Async

Use the await declaration to invoke & wait for some JS inline with your script. It works great when Bash doesn't quite do what you need.

import fs from 'fs-extra'

await shellac.in(cwd)`
  await ${ async () => {
    await fs.writeFile(
      path.join(cwd, 'bigfile.dat'),
      huge_data
    )
  }}
  
  $ ls -l
  stdout >> ${(files) => expect(files).toMatch('bigfile.dat')}
`

Interpolated commands

Inside a $ command you can use string interpolation like normal:

await shellac.in(cwd)`
  $ echo "${JSON.stringify({ current_sha, current_branch })}" > git_info.json
`

These can even be promises or async functions:

const getAllPackageNames = async () => { /* ... */ }
await shellac.in(cwd)`
  // You can pass a promise and it will be awaited
  $ yarn link ${ getAllPackageNames() }
  
  // ...
  
  // Or pass an async function and shellac will call and await it
  $ yarn unlink ${ async () => getAllPackageNames() }
`

Persistence between commands

A shellac call invokes a single instance of bash for the duration, so changes you make are reflected later in the script:

await shellac`
  $ echo $LOL
  stdout >> ${lol => expect(lol).toBe('') }
  
  $ LOL=boats
  
  $ echo $LOL
  stdout >> ${lol => expect(lol).toBe('boats') }
`

Note: the current working directory is only configured by shellac.in() or the in ${} { ... } directive:

const cwd = __dirname
const parent_dir = path.resolve(cwd, '..')
await shellac.in(cwd)`
  // Normal behaviour
  $ pwd
  stdout >> ${pwd => expect(pwd).toBe(cwd) }
  
  // Has no effect on the remaining commands
  $ cd ..
  
  $ pwd
  stdout >> ${pwd => expect(pwd).toBe(cwd) }
  
  // If you want to change dir use in {}
  in ${ parent_dir } {
    $ pwd
    stdout >> ${pwd => expect(pwd).toBe(parent_dir) }
  }
  
  // Or do it on a single line
  $ cd .. && pwd
  stdout >> ${pwd => expect(pwd).toBe(parent_dir) }
  
  // Joining commands with ; also works
  $ cd ..; pwd
  stdout >> ${(pwd) => expect(pwd).toBe(parent_dir)}
`

Comments

All these examples are valid, since // single-line-comments are ignored as expected.

Example

Works great with ts-jest:

// ts-jest-example.test.js
import shellac from 'shellac'

describe('my CLI tool', () => {
  it('should do everything I need', async () => {
    await shellac`
      $ echo "Hello, world!"
      stdout >> ${(echo) => {
        expect(echo).toBe('Hello, world!')
      }}
      
      $ rm -rf working-dir
      $ mkdir -p working-dir/example
      $ cp -R fixtures/run-1/* working-dir/example
      
      await ${async () => {
        // generate some more test data
      }}
      
      in ${'working-dir/example'} {
        $ ls -l
        stdout >> ${(files) => {
          expect(files).toMatch('package.json')
        }}
        
        $ yarn
        $$ run-app
      }
    `
  })
})

Using CommonJS, import it like:

const test = require('ava')
const shellac = require('shellac').default

test('plugin should be installable', async (t) => {
  await shellac.default`
    $ echo "Hello, world!"
    stdout >> ${(echo) => {
      t.is(echo, 'Hello, world!')
    }}
  `
})

Snippets

Use double-$ $$ for logging while the test runs:

shellac.in(cwd)`
  $$ ls -al
`

is the same as:

shellac.in(cwd)`
  $ ls -al
  stdout >> ${console.log}
`

Confirm a file is present:

shellac`
  $ ls -l
  stdout >> ${files => expect(files).toMatch('fab.zip')}
`

Acknowledgements

@kitten for reghex which is genuinely incredible and the only reason this library is possible at all.

@superhighfives for coming up with the name!

exactly, bats, Expect, cram, aruba for prior art.

Downloads/wk

1

GitHub Stars

152

LAST COMMIT

8mos ago

MAINTAINERS

1

CONTRIBUTORS

4

OPEN ISSUES

2

OPEN PRs

1
VersionTagPublished
0.0.3
latest
2yrs ago
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