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@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env
npm i @julr/vite-plugin-validate-env
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@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env

✅ Vite plugin for validating your environment variables

by Julien Ripouteau

0.2.1 (see all)License:MITTypeScript:Built-In
npm i @julr/vite-plugin-validate-env
Readme

This Vite plugin allows you to validate your environment variables at build or dev time. This allows your build/dev-server to fail-fast if your setup is misconfigured.

No more CI to restart because you are missing an environment variable, or to realize after 10 minutes of debugging that you forgot a variable 🥲

Features

  • Validate your environment variables at build time. No runtime overhead
  • Totally type-safe
  • Support multiple validation librairies ( Zod, and @poppinss/validator-lite )
  • Parsing, validation, transformation
  • Custom rules and error messages

Installation

pnpm add -D @julr/vite-plugin-validate-env

Usage

vite-plugin-validate-env plugin allows you to validate your env, either with a very simplified builtin validation lib, or with Zod in the most complex cases when you want a very strict validation.

Plugin options

The easiest way to define the options is to directly define the scheme as follows:

// vite.config.ts
import { defineConfig } from "vite";
import { ValidateEnv } from "@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env";

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    ValidateEnv({
      VITE_MY_VAR: Schema.string()
    }),
  ],
})

In case you want to change some plugin options, in particular change the validator (for Zod), you have to set your options as follows:

import { defineConfig } from "vite";
import { z } from 'zod'
import { ValidateEnv } from "@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env";

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    ValidateEnv({
      validator: 'zod',
      schema: {
        VITE_MY_VAR: z.string()
      }
    }),
  ],
})

Built-in validator

import { Schema, ValidateEnv } from "@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env"
import { defineConfig } from "vite";

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [
    ValidateEnv({
      // Data types
      VITE_STRING_VARIABLE: Schema.string(),
      VITE_BOOLEAN_VARIABLE: Schema.boolean(),
      VITE_NUMBER_VARIABLE: Schema.number(),
      VITE_ENUM_VARIABLE: Schema.enum(['foo', 'bar'] as const),
      
      // Optional variable
      VITE_OPTIONAL_VARIABLE: Schema.boolean.optional(),

      // Specify string format
      VITE_AUTH_API_URL: Schema.string({ format: 'url', protocol: true }),

      // Specify error message
      VITE_APP_PORT: Schema.number({ message: 'You must set a port !' }),

      // Custom validator
      VITE_CUSTOM_VARIABLE: (key, value) => {
        if (!value) {
          throw new Error(`Missing ${key} env variable`)
        }

        if (value.endsWith('foo')) {
          throw new Error('Value cannot end with "foo"')
        }

        return value
      },
    }),
  ],
})

Zod Validator

To use the Zod validator, you must first install it if you have not already done so

pnpm install zod

Then, you can use it as follows:

// env.ts
import { defineConfig } from '@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env'
import { z } from 'zod'

export default defineConfig({
  validator: 'zod',
  schema: {
    VITE_MY_STRING: z.string().min(5, 'This is too short !'),
    VITE_ENUM: z.enum(['a', 'b', 'c']),
    VITE_BOOLEAN_VARIABLE: z.boolean(),
  }
})

Beware, there are some limitations if you use Zod. For example, you can't use a boolean or number type directly. Because everything that comes from your .env file is a string by default.

So to validate a boolean you must use preprocess, and transform, like this:

// env.ts
import { defineConfig } from '@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env'
import { z } from 'zod'

export default defineConfig({
  validator: 'zod',
  schema: {
    VITE_BOOLEAN_VARIABLE: z
      .preprocess((value) => value === 'true' || value === '1', z.boolean())
  }
})

In this case, true and 1 will be transformed to true and your variable will be valid and considered as a boolean.

Dedicated config file

You can also add a env.ts file at the root of your project to define your environment variables.

// vite.config.ts
import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import { ValidateEnv } from "@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env";

export default defineConfig({
  plugins: [ValidateEnv()],
})
// env.ts
import { defineConfig, Schema } from '@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env'

export default defineConfig({
 VITE_MY_VAR: Schema.enum(['foo', 'bar'] as const),
})

Transforming variables

In addition to the validation of your variables, there is also a parsing that is done. This means that you can modify the value of an environment variable before it is injected.

Let's imagine the following case: you want to expose a variable VITE_AUTH_API_URL in order to use it to call an API. However, you absolutely need a trailing slash at the end of this environment variable. Here's how it can be done :

// Built-in validation
import { defineConfig, Schema } from '@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env'

export default defineConfig({
  VITE_AUTH_API_URL: (key, value) => {
    if (!value) {
      throw new Error(`Missing ${key} env variable`)
    }

    if (!value.endsWith('/')) {
      return `${value}/`
    }

    return value
  },
})
// Zod validation
import { defineConfig } from '@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env'
import { z } from 'zod'

export default defineConfig({
  validator: 'zod',
  schema: {
    VITE_AUTH_API_URL: z
      .string()
      .transform((value) => value.endsWith('/') ? value : `${value}/`),
  },
})

Now, in your client front-end code, when you call import.meta.env.VITE_AUTH_API_URL, you can be sure that it will always end with a slash.

Typing import.meta.env

In order to have a type-safe import.meta.env, the ideal is to use the dedicated configuration file env.ts. Once this is done, you would only need to add an env.d.ts in src/ folder to augment ImportMetaEnv (as suggested here ) with the following content:

/// <reference types="vite/client" />

type ImportMetaEnvAugmented = import('@julr/vite-plugin-validate-env').ImportMetaEnvAugmented<
  typeof import('../env').default
>

interface ImportMetaEnv extends ImportMetaEnvAugmented {
  // Now import.meta.env is totally type-safe and based on your `env.ts` schema definition
  // You can also add custom variables that are not defined in your schema
}

License

MIT License © 2022 Julien Ripouteau

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VersionTagPublished
0.2.1
latest
11d ago
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