pas
github.com/kisom/password
go get github.com/kisom/password
pas

github.com/kisom/password

The CLI password manager I wrote for me.

go get github.com/kisom/password
Readme

password

a command line password manager

UPDATE: this has been superceded by the tools in cryptutils.

This a personal password manager, written for me, that operates on the command line. It stores and retrieves passwords and optional metadata as well. By default, passwords are stored to ${HOME}/.passwords.db (you can see this with password -h, observing the default value for the -f flag). This can be changed by passing an argument to the -f flag.

This isn't designed for sharing passwords or anything terribly complicated. It's essentially a password-protected key-value store. It's not meant for using with a phone (I avoid using mine as much as possible).

Usage

To add a new password (password set):

password -s label

To retrieve the password for label:

password label

To retrieve a password in a form suitable for exporting to the clipboard:

password -x label

To change the password for label (password set overwriting):

password -s -o label

To remove the password for label (password remove):

password -r label

To change the master password for the password store:

password -c

To add metadata to label (password store metadata):

password -s -m label

To view metadata when retrieving the password for label (password metadata):

password -m label

To enter multiple labels and passwords in the same session:

password -multi

Both entering metadata and multiple labels/passwords will stop when the first empty line is entered.

Example

For the sake of argument, let's assume you have three accounts:

  • example.net with password "password1"
  • example.com with password "password2"
  • example.org with password "password3"

The example.com account additionally has three security questions:

  • Q. "What is your name?" A. "Sir Lancelot of Camelot"
  • Q. "What is your quest?" A. "To seek the Holy Grail"
  • Q. "What is your favourite colour?" A. "blue"

Since you're using password for the first time, you can enter all these passwords at once:

$ password -multi
Use an empty name to indicate that you are done.
Name: example.net
Password: 
Name: example.com
Password: 
Name: example.org
Password: 
Name: 
Database passphrase: 
$ 

If you list the accounts stored:

$ password -l
Password store passphrase: 
Names:
        example.com
        example.net
        example.org

You can enter the security questions for example.com:

$ password -s -m example.com
Password store passphrase: 
Enter metadata; use an empty line to indicate that you are done.
key = value: What is your name? = Sir Lancelot of Camelot
key = value: What is your quest? = To seek the Holy Grail
key = value: What is your favourite colour? = blue
key = value: 
$

By default, password won't show metadata when retrieving a password:

$ password example.com
Password store passphrase: 
Password: "password2"
$

You can show metadata with the -m flag:

$ password -m example.com
Password store passphrase: 
Password: "password2"
What is your quest?="To seek the Holy Grail"
What is your favourite colour?="blue"
What is your name?="Sir Lancelot of Camelot"

Perhaps you want to copy the password to the clipboard on your OpenBSD machine:

$ password -x example.net | xclip
Password store passphrase: %

Over on your Mac, you can do the same with:

password -x example.net | pbcopy
Password store passphrase: %

Meanwhile, it looks like example.org has changed their privacy policy, and you don't like the direction they're taking. So, you've deleted your account there. Time to remove it from password:

$ password -r example.org
Password store passphrase:
Done.
$

If you list your accounts again:

 $ password -l
Password store passphrase: 
Names:
        example.com
        example.net
$

Some time passes, and you think you should change your master password.

$ password -c
Password store passphrase: 
Changing password...
Password store passphrase:
$

If you wanted to back up your password database, you can pass around the binary file, or you can export to PEM.

$ password -export -
-----BEGIN PASSWORD STORE-----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-----END PASSWORD STORE-----

$

Maybe you'd rather actually store it to a file, instead of printing to standard output:

$ password -export passwords.pem
$ cat passwords.pem 
-----BEGIN PASSWORD STORE-----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-----END PASSWORD STORE-----

$

Now, you want to import this on another machine:

$ password -import passwords.pem
$ password -l                   
Password store passphrase: 
Names:
        example.com
        example.net
$

(The password for this example store is "password1", and you can import it on your machine from PEM to see for yourself.)

It looks like your favourite colour is now yellow, so you'll want to remove that bit of metadata and re-add it:

$ password -r -m example.com
Password store passphrase: 
Keys:
        What is your favourite colour?
        What is your name?
        What is your quest?
Remove key: What is your favourite colour?
Deleted key What is your favourite colour?
Remove key:
$ password -s -m example.com
Password store passphrase: 
Enter metadata; use an empty line to indicate that you are done.
key = value: What is your favourite colour? = yellow
key = value: 
$

One of your friends now has a hot startup at example.io, and you want to add your account there:

 $ password -s example.io
Password store passphrase: 
Password:

Time passes, and you get an email from example.com that they've had a database breach, and your password is compromised. As a safety measure, password won't let you just overwrite a password:

$ password -s example.com
Password store passphrase: 
[!] entry exists, not forcing overwrite
$

You can tell password to overwrite the stored passphrase with the -o flag:

 $ password -s -o example.com
Password store passphrase: 
[!] *** warning: overwriting password
Password:
$

There's not much else to password.

Import / export

The password store can be imported from PEM or exported to PEM. Pass either "-export" or "-import", and provide the source (when importing) or destination (when exporting) file as the only argument. If "-" is used as a filename, password will use either standard input or standard output, as appropriate. This might be useful, for example, in emailing the file to yourself or storing a printed backup.

The password store:

The password are stored internally using a Go map; when dumped to disk, it is first encoded to JSON, then encrypted using NaCl's secretbox. The key for NaCl is derived using Scrypt (N=32768, r=8, p=4) with a 32-byte salt that is randomly generated each time the file is saved. The salt is stored as the first 32 bytes of the file.

I've taken care to attempt zeroing memory and passphrases where I can, but there are no guarantees this is effective.

JSON layout

{
    "Version": 1,
    "Timestamp": 1400529440,
    "Store": {
        "example.net": {
            "Timestamp": 1400529440,
            "Password": "cGFzc3dvcmQ=",
            "Metadata": {
                "email": "me@example.net"
            }
        },
        "example.org": {
            "Timestamp":  1400537177,
            "Password": "cGFzc3dvcmQy"
        }
    }
}

See also

  • OTPC -- a one-time password / two-factor command line client.
  • apg -- the automated password generator. It's in OpenBSD's packages, Ubuntu's repositories, and Homebrew (and possibly others that I didn't check). I use this for generating passwords.

License

password is released under the ISC license.

GitHub Stars

12

LAST COMMIT

8yrs ago

MAINTAINERS

0

CONTRIBUTORS

3

OPEN ISSUES

0

OPEN PRs

0
VersionTagPublished
v0.0.0-20140819193547-e091da80d56f
1yr ago
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