aws
github.com/jonstacks/aws
go get github.com/jonstacks/aws
aws

github.com/jonstacks/aws

AWS golang pkg, binaries, utils, etc.

by Jonathan Stacks

v0.0.0-20211124050021-e019b5cf24a9 (see all)License:MIT
go get github.com/jonstacks/aws
Readme

aws

CI

AWS golang pkg, binaries, utils, etc.

Install

You can install most simply by using go get:

go get -u github.com/jonstacks/aws/cmd/...

Reservation Audits

Occasionally, you might find yourself wanting to quickly audit reservations that you've purchased, making sure you are using all of your reserved instances, or maybe finding out how many more you need to reserve. You can use the following commands found in the cmd folder for just that purpose.

reserved-instance-audit

Audits your reserved EC2 instances against your currently running ones.

reserved-instance-audit

Options:

  • --only-unmatched: Show only instance types that are not perfectly reserved.

reserved-rds-audit

Audits your reserved RDS instances against your currently running ones.

reserved-rds-audit

Auditing EC2 Instances

You might want to audit your existing EC2 Instances to make sure they meet certain criteria.

instances-without-cost-tag

The instances-without-cost-tag command finds running instances that do not contain a non-empty cost tag. This is helpful for making sure all instances are accounted for on an internal bill back basis.

Auditing RDS Snapshots

The rds-snapshot-audit command gets a list of running DB instances and a list of rds snapshots. It then compares the both lists to find snapshots whose identifier no longer exists in the running DB instances. While not always the case, there is a chance that these snapshots are no longer needed and can be cleaned up to save you money. At the time of this writing, the cost for RDS:ChargedBackupUsage is $0.095/(GBMonth) of storage. That means a 3 TB DB that is no longer around that still has a snapshot could* be costing you $285/month or $3,420/year. If your bill has a RDS:ChargedBackupUsage then this tool might be for you.

rds-snapshot-audit

Finding available subnet space in a VPC

When you want to create a new subnet, it can be difficult to see all of the ranges that are available to you in the console. This utility shows you the largest contiguous subnet space available to you in your VPC.

vpc-free-ranges

Getting a download URL for your RDS logs

It appears that both the awscli and sdk libraries are broken for downloading RDS logs. I have experienced this grief as well. So, I have made a program based on the git issues below that will give you a download link to download the complete logs:

You can install it with:

go get -u github.com/jonstacks/aws/cmd/rds-logs-download-url

Along with a program like curl you can have a complete solution to downloading your RDS logs like so:

#!/bin/bash

set -e

# This program requires that you supply these AWS environment variables.
# Can possibly pull this out of an AWS config in the future.
export AWS_DEFAULT_REGION="us-west-2"
export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=""
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=""

# Change the following 2 environment variables to the specific values
# for your DB instance and the log name
export DB_IDENTIFIER="fc16fu3t5aah9e9"
export LOG_NAME="error/postgresql.log.2018-04-08-15"

LOG_URL=$(rds-logs-download-url $DB_IDENTIFIER $LOG_NAME)
# -s for silent, -f for fail so we can retry on failure
curl -sf -o $(basename $LOG_NAME) $LOG_URL

Note: I have only really tested this against the us-west-2 region. It might need some additional changes to support others use cases.

Sync RDS logs to a local directory

Similar to the above command for getting a download URL for a given log and DB instance identifier, this command will sync all logs for a given DB instance identifier to a given local directory. This can be useful to run on a cron for syncing logs to a directory, so applications like pgbadger can process them.

You can install it with:

go get -u github.com/jonstacks/aws/cmd/sync-rds-logs

The usage is as follows:

Usage:
  sync-rds-logs <dbInstanceIdentifier> <directory>

Example:
  sync-rds-logs some-identifier /my/log/directory

Getting the IP of an EC2 Instance from the Spot Instance Request ID

To easily get the internal IP address of an instance given the spot instance request id, you can run the following:

And the output:

10.1.132.15
10.1.136.232

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