tt
github.com/jackofmosttrades/tls-tproxy
go get github.com/jackofmosttrades/tls-tproxy
tt

github.com/jackofmosttrades/tls-tproxy

Transparent L4 proxy for adding mutual TLS

go get github.com/jackofmosttrades/tls-tproxy
Readme

tls-tproxy

TLS tproxy is a transparent proxy which wraps plaintext TCP connections with mutual TLS. This allows you to run a single proxy process that can route connections to any number of different backend services. For example, this proxy would allow an unmodified database client that doesn't know how to use (mutual) TLS to connect to any number of database that require client authentication.

The primary use-case for this tool is to enable use of tools that cannot do mutual TLS (either because they lack an implementation or the implementation is incomplete) to operate without changes, even if they talk to multiple different backends, each with their own TLS certificate.

Usage

Suppose you have services listening on port 443 which require mutual TLS authentication and which present publicly trusted server certificates. You can start tls-tproxy with a command such as:

sudo tls-tproxy --cert client.crt --key client.key --portMap 8443:443

Now whenever a client makes a connection to any hostname using port 8433, it will transparently be rerouted through the proxy process and sent to port 443. For example:

curl http://my-secure-service.example.com:8443/do-the-thing

Note that the rewriting of port numbers is not required (but it can be convenient as a way to denote what traffic needs to be proxied). If you want to add client authentication to all connections on port 443 you can instead use --portMap 443:443.

How it works

Diagram

tls-tproxy creates an IP tables rule to redirect outbound traffic (which can be limited to particular port(s) or to traffic from a particular user) to the proxy process. Using the SO_ORIGINAL_DST socket feature, the proxy can determine the original destination and create the proxy tunnel.

The biggest challenge is determining what server name to expect in the server certificate so that the TLS tunnel can be properly fully authenticated. The proxy only knows the IP of the target. To figure out what DNS name was used to connect to the target, the proxy uses pcap to sniff for DNS traffic and keeps a cache of DNS name resolutions made on the system. This allows the proxy to build a reverse map from the IP to possible DNS names the client used.

This trick is fragile and carries security risk with it. This tool should not be used in contexts that are highly security sensitive. Please use your discretion.

Plugins

This project supports a plugin model for customizing how server certificates are verified. Check out the san_verifier plugin for an example of how to build a plugin. Critically, a plugin should call plugin.Register(...) in its init() function to register the plugin when the package is imported.

In the Go module where you have created your plugins, you can create a package that builds the executable with your plugins by importing the packages and calling cmd.Main(). For example:

package main

import (
    "github.com/jackofmosttrades/tls-tproxy/cmd"
    _ "git.example.com/custom-tls-tproxy/plugins/my-awesome-plugin"
)

func main() {
    cmd.Main()
}

GitHub Stars

12

LAST COMMIT

1yr ago

MAINTAINERS

0

CONTRIBUTORS

1

OPEN ISSUES

0

OPEN PRs

0
VersionTagPublished
v0.0.0-20210407215450-1d45a67a0188
1yr ago
v0.0.0-20210407202847-bca75903037b
1yr ago
v0.0.0-20210407184643-6ed84df7d2ac
1yr ago
No alternatives found
No tutorials found
Add a tutorial